Ciudad Nezahualcóyotl. Historia del México emergente.

Publicado en 'Actualidad Mundial' por MexiHumboldt, 22 Mar 2011.





  1. MexiHumboldt

    MexiHumboldt Miembro de oro

    Registro:
    4 Feb 2011
    Mensajes:
    6,151
    Likes:
    4,369




    Traigo este post a los hermanos peruanos y latinoamericanos.

    Sé que a veces México, por su condición geográfica tiende a mirar mas al "norte" pero no nos podemos sustraer de la misma problemática que compartimos todos los países. Pobreza extrema, marginación, falta de oportunidades, emigración en masa, inseguridad, inflación,etc...

    De México se escuchan pocas noticias buenas hoy en dia. Muerte, narco, sicarios, secuestros, y mil cosas mas que nuestros medios se encargan en gritar a los cuatro vientos como si por ello fueran a lograr algo.

    La realidad es que, con todo y Juarez (una ciudad MUY ALEJADA del resto de México y nada representativa del promedio), nuestro país tiene unas tasas de asesinatos menor a Brasíl, Colombia o Perú. Ya ni hablar de Centroamérica.


    Ciudad Nezahualcóyotl es una de esas historias. Una que pocos conocen pero que es real. Una ciudad que se fundó en un desierto y un lodazál, restos de una zona del antiguo Lago de Texcoco que se secó.

    La que fuera una tragedia humanitaria y ecológica es hoy una historia de triunfo ante la adversidad y un gran homenaje a ese gran rey poeta azteca que fuera Nezahualcóyotl.

    Aquí comparto un video con fotos e historias del pasado de Cd. Neza.



    Una ciudad que se formó de la NADA, por inmigrantes de las regiones mas pobres de México, y que por cierto, hoy acoge a millones de personas de todos los niveles sociales con una integración poco vista en nuestra región.


    Este reportaje salió en THE ECONOMIST

    A special report on Latin America

    Societies on the move
    Expanding the middle class requires better schools and reforms in public spending

    Sep 9th 2010 | from the print edition

    [​IMG]Hands up if you want a better teacher
    HOME to over 1.5m people, Nezahualcóyotl sprawls over a flat, dried-up lake bed on the eastern outskirts of Mexico City. Back in the 1980s it was an impoverished settlement of dirt streets and one-storey shacks built of grey concrete blocks. Today the shacks have become comfortable homes of two or three storeys, the streets are asphalted and the traffic-clogged thoroughfares are lined with businesses of every type, lots of restaurants and several imposing gyms to work off all those meals. Since last year they have been facing competition from a big new shopping mall that would not look out of place in a suburb in the United States, anchored by Sears and C&A, with scores of boutiques and a multiplex cinema. Next door stands a large Wal-Mart and a private hospital that offers low-cost treatment. Behind, on a former rubbish dump, a new outdoor sports centre with 19 football pitches opened in July, operated by the charitable arm of Telmex, a telecoms firm.
    Few people in Neza, as it is known, are still poor. “Before, people wanted a bicycle to get to the market. Now the least they want is a secondhand Volkswagen. They can afford to go out to eat at the weekend and take a holiday once a year, going to Acapulco,” says Luis Ayala, a journalist who was born in Neza and now works for its mayor. His story typifies gradual upward mobility: his father was a factory worker; his elder son is studying at a university in Neza and wants to become an engineer, and his younger son is studying to be a dance teacher. This progress nearly always requires the extended family to pull together. Mr Ayala and his wife augment their income with two market shops. They live on a separate floor in his father’s house and have two cars.
    Neza exemplifies the rise in living standards many Mexicans have enjoyed since the recession of 1995. Over that period economic growth has been steady rather than spectacular. To a greater or lesser extent, this picture is repeated across Latin America. It has led some commentators to claim that the region is well on the way to building middle-class societies. That would have profound implications, for everything from politics to business.


    But how middle-class?

    [​IMG]

    “Middle class” is a slippery concept. What is clear is that Latin American societies are changing rapidly in response to urbanisation, democracy, economic reform and globalisation. Poverty has declined almost everywhere. Just as important, income distribution has been getting less unequal in many countries. In Brazil and Mexico the Gini coefficient, a measure of inequality, has been falling since the mid-1990s. According to a new study by Luis López-Calva and Nora Lustig, between 2000 and 2006 the Gini coefficient came down in 12 of 17 countries for which there are comparable data, including all the larger ones. Even so, income distribution in Latin America remains the most unequal in any continent (see charts 3 and 4). Such extreme inequality causes many problems. It is almost certainly a factor in Latin America’s alarming crime rates, for example (see article).
    [​IMG]
    The decline in poverty is a result of faster economic growth and the conquest of inflation (which eroded the incomes of the poor), but also of better social policies. In particular, conditional cash-transfer (CCT) programmes—an invention of Latin America’s democracies—have proved effective in helping the poor. Under these schemes mothers receive a small monthly stipend (ranging from about $5 to $33 per child) as long as they keep their children at school and take them for health checks. Some 110m people in the region now benefit from such transfer schemes, according to the World Bank. Most of the schemes are well-targeted and relatively cheap, costing around 0.5% of GDP. Mexico’s Oportunidades programme is estimated to have reduced poverty by eight percentage points. Brazil’s Bolsa Família has made millions of extremely poor people less destitute. There is evidence, too, that such programmes have raised school enrolment and attendance and reduced drop-out rates, as well as increasing take-up of pre- and post-natal care and vaccinations.
    The CCTs and longer attendance at school have helped to reduce income inequality. A better-educated workforce has been able to command higher pay. Income distribution has become more equal in countries with governments of both left and right, though Mr López-Calva and Ms Lustig found that social democratic governments (such as Lula’s in Brazil and the Concertación coalition that governed Chile between 1990 and March 2010) are more redistributive than those of the centre-right or populists such as Mr Chávez.
    CCTs on their own cannot improve the standard of education and health, which especially in the countryside often remains poor. But the spread of modern communications and electrification programmes are starting to transform rural areas. Mr Webb, the former central-bank governor in Peru, finds that in some of the remotest and poorest provinces of the Peruvian Andes better roads and mobile telephones have allowed former subsistence farmers to produce more lucrative items, such as cheese or vegetables and also take jobs in local towns.
    All this has meant that across the region the lower middle class—what marketing people call social class C—has expanded. In Brazil Marcelo Neri of the Fundação Getulio Vargas, a research institute, defines this group as having a monthly household income of between 1,064 reais ($608) and 4,561 reais ($2,606). By 2008 it accounted for 53% of the population, up from 43% in 2002. The OECD, in its forthcoming Latin American Economic Outlook, defines the middle class as those with incomes ranging from 50% to 150% of the median. By this yardstick 275m people in Latin America and the Caribbean, or just under half the total, were middle-class in 2006. The proportion ranged from 56% in Uruguay to 37% in Bolivia, compared with 68% in Italy. It is worth noting that many of these people would be considered poor in better-off countries: the median annual income ranged from $2,820 in Bolivia to $6,036 in Mexico, whereas in Italy it was $18,816.
    But income alone captures only part of the improvement in living standards. The money also goes further, as Luis de la Calle and Luis Rubio point out in a study on Mexico. First, nuclear families have got smaller. Today the average Mexican woman has two children, compared with seven in the 1960s. Second, opening the economy to trade has sharply reduced the price of many goods. Economic stability, too, has brought many benefits. Home loans almost tripled between 1998 and 2006, with over 7m new homes built in Mexico over the past decade. In 1960 four-fifths of Mexican homes had at most two rooms and no toilet; now 60% have three rooms or more and have a flushing lavatory.
    Traditionally the middle class in Latin America was employed in the public sector. The new lower middle class is more entrepreneurial, though many of its members work at least partly in the informal economy. They aspire to the six Cs: casa propia (a home of one’s own), a car, a cellphone, a computer, cable (or satellite) television and trips to the cinema.
    All this progress is still fragile, and not everyone finds a way out of poverty. The children of poor households, and especially those in rural areas and of black or indigenous descent, are much less likely than the average Latin American to complete their schooling or have somewhere decent to live. A study for the World Bank found that between a quarter and a half of differences in consumption were due to such inequalities of opportunity. And there is a long way to go. If Brazil wants to achieve average social conditions for a country of its income level, it must keep up its “fantastic” progress in tackling deprivation over the past 15 years for another two decades, says Ricardo Paes de Barros of the Institute for Applied Economic Research, a government-linked think-tank.


    SEGUNDA PARTE EN PROXIMO POST....


    CON GUSTO PONDRE EL REPORTAJE TRADUCIDO EN MI SIGUIENTE POST
     
    A LuisCuahutemoc le gustó este mensaje.


  2. MexiHumboldt

    MexiHumboldt Miembro de oro

    Registro:
    4 Feb 2011
    Mensajes:
    6,151
    Likes:
    4,369
    SEGUNDA PARTE DEL REPORTAJE

    Back to school


    If it is to become a middle-class society, Latin America’s first priority must be to improve the quality of schooling. Over the past 20 years the region’s democracies have made a big effort to get children into the classroom. Primary schooling is almost universal, except in some of the poorer Central American countries; 70% of the children in the region now start secondary school, up from 60% in 1999 (but 90% do in rich countries). The number in some form of tertiary education has risen from a fifth to a third over the same period. But many drop out, and many who stay do not learn much. The six Latin American countries that took part in the OECD’s PISA study on educational achievement in 2006 all ranked in the bottom third of the 57 countries covered.
    At least people are becoming more aware of the need to improve the quality of public education. That is particularly clear in Brazil, where the progressive education policies of the governments of Fernando Henrique Cardoso (1995-2003) have been broadly continued under Lula. Both the government and educational pressure groups are backing a campaign that aims to raise school performance to developed-country levels by 2021, the eve of the bicentennial of Brazil’s independence. The government has introduced a national exam to monitor standards, and some states have followed suit. In São Paulo the state education secretary, Paulo Renato Souza (who was education minister for eight years under Mr Cardoso), has also introduced a standard curriculum, required teachers to submit to a proficiency test and linked big salary increases for them to better school results in the standard tests.
    The proof of these policies will be whether they work in places like the Colegio Recanto Verde Sol, a school in Jardim Iguatemi, a jumble of favelas climbing over steep hills next to a patch of virgin rainforest on São Paulo’s eastern fringe. The school, built in 2005, is clean and reasonably well-equipped, with a small library, video room and cafeteria for school meals. But its results are poor. That is partly because its 1,800 pupils study in three shifts: 11- to 15-year-olds in the morning, six- to ten-year-olds in the afternoon, and over-15s in the evening, sometimes not finishing until 11pm. Not surprisingly, many older pupils drop out: “In secondary, we begin the year with seven classes and end with three or four,” says Angela Regina Rodrigues, the head teacher.
    Ms Rodrigues is charismatic and committed but somewhat defensive. Her main problem is getting teachers to turn up. Classes are too big, with 40 or more pupils. Ms Rodrigues herself has a second job at night, teaching history at another school. But she is trying to raise the quality of teaching and to get parents more involved.
    The problems at Recanto Verde Sol are mirrored (and often magnified) across Latin America. Spending on education has increased almost everywhere, but average spending per pupil is only a fifth that in developed countries, according to the OECD. One reason for that is a demographic bulge that will soon subside. The main task is to train better teachers and to link extra spending to teacher performance. Attempts to do this in Mexico have largely foundered on opposition from the powerful teachers’ union. Teachers there have jobs for life, which can be bequeathed, bought or sold. Mexico’s president, Felipe Calderón, got the union to agree that posts would be filled by public competition, but enforcing this has proved hard.
    Many countries are now trying to do some of the right things. Colombia, where Mr Uribe kept the same, competent, education minister for eight years, and Chile have both made big efforts to expand pre-school education, for example. In Peru the government of President Alan García introduced compulsory evaluation of teachers; when many of them failed the first exam, the teachers’ union was thrown on the defensive. But many parents are complacent about their children’s schooling, content that they are staying at school longer than they did themselves.
    Others are voting against state education with their feet. The rich in Latin America have long sent their children to private schools, whence they often move on to free public universities. The lower middle class is following suit. In the decade to 2009 the number of private schools in Mexico rose by more than a third, to 45,000. In Peru Mr Rodríguez Pastor, the banker, has started a business aiming to provide good-quality schools in poorer areas. So far he has got three. He wants to turn teaching into a desirable career by offering good training, pay and conditions.


    A welfare state of sorts


    The second thing Latin America must do to turn itself into a more equal society is to reform public spending, which remains inequitable and shot through with perverse incentives. After the second world war many countries in the region set up European-style contributory health-care and pensions schemes, and in some cases unemployment insurance too. But these systems cover only a minority of workers (mostly the better-off), mainly because of the prevalence of the informal economy. Add in tax systems that rely heavily on consumption taxes, which hit the poor disproportionately hard, and taxes and government transfers reduce the Gini coefficient of income inequality by under two percentage points in Latin America, compared with 19 percentage points in Europe, according to the OECD.
    The spread of democracy has prompted efforts to make society fairer by putting in place a modest welfare state. The cash-transfer programmes are the most prominent element, but many countries have also introduced non-contributory minimum pensions, and some have provided cheap health insurance to cover drugs and treatments at public hospitals. These innovations reinforce the idea that in a democracy all citizens have certain basic rights. But they have had the unintended effect of creating a two-tier system, full of duplication and contradictions.


    Watch those income disparities


    The first task for Latin American governments is to strengthen the emerging social safety-net. Bolsa Família and Oportunidades have been extended to urban areas, where many poor people now live. But greater income disparities in cities make targeting harder, and urban poverty often has complex causes. That is recognised in Chile, where the proportion of poor people in the population fell from 45% in the mid-1980s to under 14% in 2006. It rose a little in 2009, to 15%, partly because of the recession, but the increase also prompted officials in the new conservative government of Sebastian Piñera to question the effectiveness of social spending. Yet Andrés Velasco, the finance minister in the previous government, points out that the rise in world food prices pushed up the cost of the basket of staple goods typically bought by the poor by 36% between 2006 and 2009, whereas overall inflation was only 14%. Without social policies to cushion this shock, the proportion of people in poverty would have risen to 19%, he says.
    That looks like a vindication of Chile Solidario, a programme aimed at eradicating extreme poverty. It puts the destitute in touch with social workers to make sure they benefit from programmes including job training, education and housing as well as income support. Colombia has set up a similar scheme. In Peru a programme in the poorest parts of the southern Andes has reduced child malnutrition.
    These programmes are more complicated and costly than CCTs but they can be more effective, especially in cities. Ricardo Paes de Barros, who advises Marina da Silva, the Green Party candidate in October’s presidential election, wants to see such a scheme in Brazil. He says it could deploy an existing network of community health agents. With Bolsa Família “for the first time we managed to identify a group of the poor who weren’t visible before. Now we can make sure the poor receive social assistance in a joined-up way,” he says.
    The second big task for the region’s governments is to ensure that social policies take account of the dual labour market. The CCT payments in themselves are not big enough to discourage people from working. But there is some evidence that additional non-contributory benefits, combined with high payroll taxes, are deterring people from taking formal jobs.
    To make benefits universal, Mr Levy of the IDB calls for a radical reform, scrapping contributory health-care and pension systems and replacing them with a unitary scheme financed by a consumption tax. This would go hand in hand with a reform of the labour market that would attempt to bridge the gap between the formal and informal sectors. His idea is backed by Enrique Peña Nieto, the likely candidate of the Institutional Revolutionary Party, or PRI (which governed Mexico for many years), in the presidential election of 2012. Economists at the World Bank think the answer is to eliminate hidden subsidies by switching pensions to defined contributions rather than defined benefits and basing health-insurance benefits on premiums rather than earnings.
    Latin America has already gone a long way towards creating a universal safety-net in the past two decades, but coverage remains patchy. To improve it, taxes will have to rise in some countries, though in Brazil and Argentina they are arguably already too high as well as too complex. Elsewhere in the region the government’s tax take has risen in recent years. But in some of the poorer countries, especially in Central America, it remains too low to finance a modern state that is capable of providing citizens with their most basic needs.


    LES PONDRE EN OTRO POST LA TRADUCCION YA QUE NO ME PERMITE EL FORO POSTS TAN LARGOS
     
    A LuisCuahutemoc le gustó este mensaje.
  3. MexiHumboldt

    MexiHumboldt Miembro de oro

    Registro:
    4 Feb 2011
    Mensajes:
    6,151
    Likes:
    4,369
    TRADUCCION PRIMERA PARTE

    HOGAR de más de 1,5 millones de personas, Nezahualcóyotl sprawls sobre una cama plana, contaminado lago en las afueras orientales de la ciudad de México. En la década de 1980 fue un asentamiento empobrecido de calles de tierra y un piso chozas construidas de bloques de cemento gris. Las chozas, hoy se han convertido en confortables casas de dos o tres pisos, las calles están asfaltadas y las vías de tráfico atascado están revestidos con empresas de todo tipo, muchos restaurantes y varios gimnasios imponentes para trabajar en todas las comidas. Desde el año pasado ha estado enfrentando la competencia de un nuevo centro comercial grande que no quedaría fuera de lugar en un suburbio en los Estados Unidos, anclado por Sears y c & A, con decenas de tiendas y un multicines. Al lado encuentra un gran Wal-Mart y un hospital privado que ofrece tratamiento de bajo costo. Detrás, en un antiguo basurero, un nuevo centro de deportes al aire libre con 19 campos de fútbol abrió en julio, operado por el brazo caritativo de Telmex, una empresa de telecomunicaciones.
    Pocas personas en Neza, como es sabido, están siendo pobres. "Antes, el pueblo quería una bicicleta para llegar al mercado. Ahora lo menos quieren es un Volkswagen de segunda mano. Pueden salir a comer en el fin de semana y tomar unas vacaciones una vez al año, va a Acapulco,", dice Luis Ayala, un periodista que nació en Neza y ahora trabaja para su alcalde. Su historia tipifica ascenso gradual: su padre era un trabajador de la fábrica; su hijo está estudiando en una Universidad de Neza y quiere llegar a ser un ingeniero, y su hijo está estudiando para ser profesor de danza. Este curso requiere casi siempre la familia ampliada a reunir. Señor Ayala y su esposa aumentan sus ingresos con dos tiendas de mercado. Viven en un piso separado en casa de su padre y dos coches.
    Neza ejemplifica el aumento del nivel de vida de que muchos mexicanos han disfrutado desde la recesión de 1995. Durante ese período el crecimiento económico ha sido constante más que espectacular. En mayor o menor medida, esta imagen se repite en toda América Latina. Ha llevado a algunos comentaristas a afirmar que la región está en camino a la construcción de sociedades de la clase media. Tendría implicaciones profundas, para todo, desde la política a los negocios.

    ¿Pero la clase media?
    .
    "Clase media" es un concepto resbaladizo. Lo que está claro es que las sociedades latinoamericanas están cambiando rápidamente en respuesta a la urbanización, la democracia, la reforma económica y la globalización. La pobreza ha disminuido en casi todas partes. Igual de importante, distribución de los ingresos que ha obtenido menos desigual en muchos países. En Brasil y México el coeficiente de Gini, una medida de la desigualdad, ha ido disminuyendo desde mediados de la década de 1990. De acuerdo con un nuevo estudio por Luis López-Calva y Nora Lustig, entre 2000 y 2006 el coeficiente de Gini bajó en 12 de 17 países para los cuales hay datos comparables, incluyendo todos los más grandes. Aún así, la distribución del ingreso en América Latina sigue siendo la más desigual en cualquier continente (véanse los cuadros 3 y 4). Tal desigualdad extrema causa muchos problemas. Es seguramente un factor en la criminalidad alarmante de América Latina, por ejemplo (ver artículo).

    .La reducción de la pobreza es un resultado de más rápido crecimiento económico y la conquista de la inflación (que erosionó los ingresos de los pobres), pero también de mejores políticas sociales. En particular, los programas de transferencia de dinero condicional (CCT), un invento de las democracias de América Latina, han demostrado ser eficaces para ayudar a los pobres. Estos regímenes las madres reciben un pequeño estipendio mensual (desde unos 5 dólares a 33 dólares por niño), mientras mantienen a sus hijos en la escuela y llevan a los controles de salud. Unos 110 millones de personas en la región ahora beneficiarán de dichos planes de transferencia, de acuerdo con el Banco Mundial. La mayoría de los regímenes son objetivos precisos y relativamente baratos, costando alrededor de 0,5% del PIB. Programa de Oportunidades de México se estima que han reducido la pobreza en ocho puntos porcentuales. Bolsa Familia Brasil ha hecho que millones de personas extremadamente pobres menos pobres. Hay pruebas, también, que esos programas han planteado la matriculación y asistencia y redujo las tasas de deserción, así como la creciente utilización de atención prenatal y posnatal y vacunas.

    La ECC y más asistencia a la escuela han ayudado a reducir la desigualdad de ingresos. Una fuerza de trabajo mejor educada ha sido capaz de salarios más elevados de comando. Distribución del ingreso se ha vuelto más igual en países con gobiernos de izquierda y derecha, aunque el señor López-Calva y Ms Lustig encontraron que los gobiernos socialdemócratas (como Lula en Brasil y la coalición de la Concertación que gobernó Chile entre 1990 y marzo de 2010) son más restrictiva que la centro-derecha o populistas como el señor Chávez.

    ECC solos no puede mejorar el nivel de educación y salud, especialmente en el campo a menudo sigue siendo pobre. Pero la propagación de las comunicaciones modernas y programas de electrificación están empezando a transformar las zonas rurales. Sr. Webb, el ex gobernador del Banco central de Perú, considera que en algunas de las provincias más pobres y remotas de los Andes peruanos mejores carreteras y teléfonos móviles han permitido a los agricultores de subsistencia ex producir elementos más lucrativos, tales como queso, verduras y también ocupar puestos de trabajo en las ciudades cercanas.

    Todo esto ha significado que en toda la región la clase media baja, lo que llaman comercialización social clase C — se ha ampliado. En Brasil Marcelo Neri, de la Fundación Getulio Vargas, un Instituto de investigación, define este grupo como un ingreso familiar mensual de entre 1.064 de reales ($608) y 4,561 de reales ($2,606). En 2008 representaron el 53% de la población, hasta del 43% en 2002. La OCDE, en sus próximas perspectivas económicas de América Latina, define la clase media como aquellos con ingresos que oscilan entre 50% a 150% de la media. Por este criterio 275 millones de personas en América Latina y el Caribe o poco menos de la mitad del total, eran de clase media en 2006. La proporción varió de 56% en Uruguay a 37% en Bolivia, en comparación con 68% en Italia. Cabe señalar que muchas de estas personas se consideraría pobres en los países más: el ingreso anual promedio oscilaba entre $2,820 en Bolivia y $6,036 en México, mientras que en Italia fue $parte.

    Pero ingresos sólo captura sólo parte de la mejora en los niveles de vida. El dinero también va más allá, como Luis de la Calle y Luis Rubio señalan un estudio sobre México. En primer lugar, las familias nucleares tienen más pequeñas. Hoy la mujer mexicana promedio tiene dos hijos, en comparación con siete en la década de 1960. En segundo lugar, abrir la economía al comercio ha reducido drásticamente el precio de muchos de los bienes. La estabilidad económica, también ha traído muchos beneficios. Hipotecas casi se triplicó entre 1998 y 2006, con más de 7 millones de nuevas viviendas construida en México durante la última década. En 1960 cuatro quintas partes de los hogares mexicanos tenían como máximo dos habitaciones y no aseo; ahora 60% tienen salas de tres o más y un lavabo baja.

    Tradicionalmente, la clase media en América Latina fue empleada en el sector público. La nueva clase media baja es más empresarial, aunque muchos de sus miembros trabajan al menos en parte en la economía informal. Aspiran a los seis Cs: casa propia (una casa propia), un coche, un teléfono celular, un equipo, (televisión por cable o satélite) e ir al cine.


    Este progreso es todavía frágil, y no todo el mundo encuentra una manera de salir de la pobreza. Los niños de hogares pobres y especialmente los de las zonas rurales y de ascendencia indígena o negra, son mucho menos probables que el promedio latinoamericano para completar sus estudios o tienen algún lugar decente vivir. Un estudio del Banco Mundial se encuentra entre un cuarto y medio de diferencias en el consumo fueron debido a las desigualdades de oportunidades. Y hay un largo camino por recorrer. Si Brasil quiere alcanzar las condiciones sociales promedio para un país de su nivel de ingresos, debe mantener su progreso "fantástico" en la lucha contra la privación en los últimos 15 años para otras dos décadas, dice Ricardo Paes de Barros, del Instituto de investigación económica aplicada, un Comité de expertos vinculados con el Gobierno.


     
    Última edición: 22 Mar 2011
    A LuisCuahutemoc le gustó este mensaje.
  4. MexiHumboldt

    MexiHumboldt Miembro de oro

    Registro:
    4 Feb 2011
    Mensajes:
    6,151
    Likes:
    4,369
    CONTINUACION

    Regreso a la escuela


    Si va a convertirse en una sociedad de clase media, debe ser prioridad de América Latina mejorar la calidad de la educación. En los últimos 20 años las democracias de la región han hecho un gran esfuerzo para lograr que los niños a la escuela. La enseñanza primaria es casi universal, excepto en algunos de los países más pobres de América Central; el 70% de los niños en la región ahora iniciar secundaria, hasta del 60% en 1999 (pero 90% en los países ricos). El número de alguna forma de educación terciaria ha aumentado de un quinto a un tercer durante el mismo período. Pero muchos abandonan, y muchos que no aprender mucho. Los seis países de América Latina que participaron en PISA la OCDE estudian en tercer lugar en el logro educativo en 2006 todo clasificado en la parte inferior de los 57 países.


    Por lo menos personas son cada vez más conscientes de la necesidad de mejorar la calidad de la educación pública. Es particularmente evidente en Brasil, donde las políticas de educación progresiva de los gobiernos de Fernando Henrique Cardoso (1995-2003) han sido ampliamente seguidas bajo Lula. El Gobierno y los grupos de presión educativos están apoyando una campaña que tiene como objetivo aumentar el rendimiento escolar a nivel de países desarrollados para el 2021, la víspera del Bicentenario de la independencia de Brasil. El Gobierno ha introducido un examen nacional para supervisar las normas, y algunos Estados han seguido el ejemplo. El Secretario de educación del Estado de São Paulo, Paulo Renato Souza (quien fue Ministro de educación durante ocho años bajo el señor Cardoso), también ha introducido un programa estándar, profesores requeridos a someterse a una prueba de aptitud y vinculado salario grande aumentos para ellos a mejores resultados escolares en las pruebas estándar.


    La prueba de estas políticas será si trabajan en lugares como el Colegio Recanto Verde Sol, una escuela en Jardim Iguatemi, un revoltijo de favelas escalada sobre colinas empinadas junto a un parche de selva virgen en la franja oriental de Sao Paulo. La escuela, construida en 2005, es limpia y razonablemente bien equipada, con una pequeña biblioteca, sala de video y cafetería para comidas escolares. Pero sus resultados son pobres. Eso es en parte porque los 1.800 alumnos estudian en tres turnos: 11 a 15 años en la mañana, seis a diez años en la tarde y más-15 de la noche, a veces no acabada hasta las 11 pm. No es sorprendente que muchos antiguos alumnos abandonan: "En la secundaria, comenzamos el año con siete clases y final con tres o cuatro," dice Angela Regina Rodrigues, el profesor de cabeza.


    MS Rodrigues es carismático y comprometido pero algo defensivo. Su principal problema es conseguir profesores a subir. Las clases son demasiado grandes, con 40 o más alumnos. MS Rodrigues, ella misma tiene un segundo empleo durante la noche, enseñanza de la historia en otra escuela. Pero ella trata de elevar la calidad de la enseñanza y a involucrarse más padres.


    Los problemas en Recanto Verde Sol son espejados (y a menudo magnifican) en toda América Latina. El gasto en educación ha aumentado casi en todas partes, pero el gasto promedio por alumno es sólo una quinta parte que en los países desarrollados, según la OCDE. Una de las razones por las es una protuberancia demográfica que pronto irá retrocediendo. La tarea principal es formar a los profesores mejores y vincular el gasto extra al desempeño docente. Los intentos de hacerlo en México han fracasado en gran medida en la oposición desde el poderoso sindicato de maestros. Maestros que tienen puestos de trabajo para la vida, que puede ser legó, comprados o vendidos. El Presidente de México, Felipe Calderón, consiguió la Unión a un acuerdo que serían ocupados puestos por concurso público, pero esta aplicación ha sido dificil.


    Muchos países ahora están tratando de hacer algunas de las cosas. Colombia, donde el señor Uribe mantiene el mismo, competente, Ministro de educación de ocho años y Chile han hecho grandes esfuerzos para expandir la educación preescolar, por ejemplo. En Perú el Gobierno del Presidente Alan García presentó la evaluación obligatoria de los docentes; cuando muchos de ellos no el primer examen, el sindicato de maestros fue arrojado a la defensiva. Pero muchos padres son complacientes sobre la escolarización de sus hijos, contenida que se encuentran en la escuela más de lo que hicieron ellos mismos.


    Otros están votando contra la educación del Estado con sus pies. Los ricos en América Latina durante mucho tiempo han enviado a sus hijos a escuelas privadas, donde pasan a menudo a universidades públicas libres. La clase media baja es lo mismo. En el decenio de 2009 el número de escuelas privadas en México aumentó en más de un tercio, a 45.000. En Perú señor Rodríguez Pastor, el banquero, ha iniciado un negocio con el objetivo de proporcionar a las escuelas de calidad en las zonas más pobres. Hasta el momento tiene tres. Él quiere convertir la enseñanza en una carrera deseable ofreciendo condiciones, remuneración y buena formación.








    ----- mensaje añadido, 22-mar-2011 a las 22:44 -----

    CONTINUACION

    Un Estado de bienestar de tipo

    La segunda cosa que América Latina debe hacer para convertirse en una sociedad más equitativa es gasto público de reforma, que sigue siendo desigual y disparo a través de incentivos perversos. Después de la Segunda Guerra Mundial muchos países de la región configurar estilo europeo salud contributiva y planes de pensiones y en el seguro de desempleo de algunos casos demasiado. Pero estos sistemas cubren sólo una minoría de los trabajadores (sobre todo las más prósperas), principalmente debido a la prevalencia de la economía informal. Añadir en los sistemas fiscales que dependen fuertemente de los impuestos al consumo, que afectó a los pobres desproporcionadamente duros, y los impuestos y transferencias del Gobierno reducen el coeficiente de Gini de desigualdad de ingresos en dos puntos porcentuales en América Latina, en comparación con 19 puntos de porcentaje en Europa, segun la OCDE.

    La propagación de la democracia ha llevado a esfuerzos para hacer que la sociedad más justa por poner en marcha un modesto estado de bienestar. Los programas de transferencia de efectivo son el elemento más destacado, pero muchos países han introducido también las pensiones mínimas de carácter no contributivo, y algunos han proporcionado barato seguro de salud para cubrir los medicamentos y tratamientos en hospitales públicos. Estas innovaciones refuerzan la idea de que en una democracia, todos los ciudadanos tienen ciertos derechos básicos. Pero han tenido el efecto no deseado de la creación de un sistema de dos niveles, lleno de duplicación y contradicciones.




    Ver esas disparidades de ingresos

    La primera tarea de los gobiernos de América Latina es fortalecer la nueva red de seguridad social. Bolsa Familia y Oportunidades se han extendido a las zonas urbanas, donde viven muchas personas pobres. Pero mayores disparidades de ingresos en las ciudades hacen dirigidos a más, y la pobreza urbana a menudo tiene causas complejas. Que es reconocido en Chile, donde la proporción de pobres en la población cayó de 45% a mediados de la década de 1980 a menores de 14% en 2006. Levantó un poco en 2009, a 15%, en parte debido a la recesión, pero el aumento también le pide a funcionarios en el nuevo gobierno conservador de Sebastian Piñera a cuestionar la eficacia del gasto social. Sin embargo Andrés Velasco, el Ministro de finanzas en el Gobierno anterior, señala que el aumento de los precios de alimentos del mundo ha hecho subir el costo de la canasta de productos básicos normalmente comprada por los pobres en un 36% entre 2006 y 2009, mientras que la inflación general fue sólo el 14%. Sin políticas sociales para amortiguar este choque, la proporción de personas en la pobreza habría aumentado a 19%, dice.

    Este parece ser una reivindicación de Chile Solidario, un programa destinado a erradicar la pobreza extrema. Pone los indigentes con trabajadores sociales para asegurarse de que se benefician de programas de empleo, formación, educación y vivienda, así como apoyo a los ingresos. Colombia ha establecido un esquema similar. En Perú un programa en las regiones más pobres de los Andes del Sur ha reducido la desnutrición infantil.

    Estos programas son más complicados y costosos que ECC, pero pueden ser más eficaces, especialmente en las ciudades. Ricardo Paes de Barros, que asesora a Marina da Silva, el candidato del Partido Verde en las elecciones presidenciales de octubre, quiere ver un plan en Brasil. Dice que podría implementar una red de agentes de salud de la comunidad. Con Bolsa Familia "por primera vez que hemos podido identificar un grupo de los pobres que no eran visibles antes. Ahora podemos asegurarnos que los pobres reciben asistencia social en forma conjunta,", dice.

    La segunda tarea grande para los gobiernos de la región es garantizar que las políticas sociales tengan en cuenta el mercado de trabajo dual. Los pagos de CCT en sí mismos no son lo suficientemente grandes como para desalentar a la gente de trabajo. Pero hay algunas pruebas que otras prestaciones no contributivas, combinados con los impuestos de nómina alta, son disuadir a la gente tomar empleos formales.

    Hacer beneficios universal, señor Levy del BID pide una reforma radical, sistemas de salud y pensión contributivos de desguace y reemplazándolos con un esquema unitario financiado por un impuesto al consumo. Esto iría de la mano con una reforma del mercado laboral que intentó salvar la brecha entre los sectores formales e informal. Su idea es respaldada por Enrique Peña Nieto, el probable candidato del Partido Revolucionario Institucional, o PRI (que gobernó México durante muchos años), en las elecciones presidenciales del 2012. Los economistas del Banco Mundial que la respuesta es eliminar las subvenciones ocultas por el cambio de las pensiones a contribuciones definidas en lugar de definido ventajas y beneficios de seguros de salud basar en las primas en lugar de las ganancias.

    América Latina ya ha recorrido un largo camino hacia la creación de una red de seguridad universal en las últimas dos décadas, pero la cobertura sigue siendo desigual. Para mejorarlo, impuestos tendrá que aumentar en algunos países, aunque en Brasil y Argentina son posiblemente ya demasiado alto como demasiado complejo. En otros lugares, en la región de impuestos del Gobierno tomar ha aumentado en los últimos años. Pero en algunos de los países más pobres, especialmente en América Central, sigue siendo insuficiente para financiar un Estado moderno que es capaz de proveer a sus ciudadanos de las necesidades básicas.

    traducido de The ECONOMIST
     
    A LuisCuahutemoc le gustó este mensaje.
  5. cajacho

    cajacho Miembro de oro

    Registro:
    14 Nov 2010
    Mensajes:
    9,235
    Likes:
    8,901
    Vendria a ser como los " conos de Lima"?
     
  6. MexiHumboldt

    MexiHumboldt Miembro de oro

    Registro:
    4 Feb 2011
    Mensajes:
    6,151
    Likes:
    4,369
    Totalmente. Villa Salvador y San Juan de Lurigancho tienen asombrosos parecidos. Por supuesto Lima es mas desértico pero la zona central de Neza era tan seca en un principio que parecía Lima.

    Ya voy a subir mas fotos.
     
  7. cajacho

    cajacho Miembro de oro

    Registro:
    14 Nov 2010
    Mensajes:
    9,235
    Likes:
    8,901
    Si sube fotos, quiero conocer Ciudad de Mexico, a pero yo vivo en Los Olivos y no conozco la parte sur de Lima solo la parte del norte y un poco del centro , Lima es grande, pero el sur es mas desertico que el norte de Lima.
     
  8. g_d

    g_d Suspendido

    Registro:
    4 Mar 2010
    Mensajes:
    28,575
    Likes:
    25,459
    esto debería ir más en turismo creo, pues no es una noticia actual como para que esté en esta sección
     
  9. cajacho

    cajacho Miembro de oro

    Registro:
    14 Nov 2010
    Mensajes:
    9,235
    Likes:
    8,901
    :w0w: Si se parece a ciertas partes de Lima.
     
  10. MexiHumboldt

    MexiHumboldt Miembro de oro

    Registro:
    4 Feb 2011
    Mensajes:
    6,151
    Likes:
    4,369
    En la actualidad Brasíl está de moda, lo mismo que China. Todo el mundo habla del famoso BRIC (que incluye también a India y Rusia) pero de México solo se comenta sobre decapitados, descuartizados, baleados, guerra y narcotráfico. Sin mimimizar el problema, hay que aceptar que está localizado en ciertas regiones, mientras el resto del país permance en relativa calma. Violencia y todo, Brasíl y Colombia la padecen en mucha mayor proporción que México, y por encima de estos, Venezuela.
    Sin entrar en comparaciones odiosas, simplemente México ha venido creciendo en forma lenta pero contínua. El TLC cambió muchas cosas en la forma de producir de la indsutria local y creó nuevas oportunidades. Con ellas llegaron nuevos retos y quienes los enfrentaron forman hoy una mayoría que crece; la clase media emergente mexicana.
    Tradicionalmente se piensa en clase media a los habitantes de colonias capitalinas como la Del Valle, Condesa, Narvarte o Satélite. Si nos vemos mas finos también Polanco, San Angel y Santa Fé. Sin embargo, estas colonias (salvo la Del Valle y Narvarte que siguen siendo muy diversas) en realidad pertenecen a la clase media-alta.
    En cambio, si se menciona a los habitantes de estas, a Ciudad Nezahualcóyotl, vienen a la mente imágenes de miseria, casas de cartón o blóques de concreto y autocosntrucción. También evoca calles de tierra, basura, tiraderos, delincuencia y la cara fea de la inmigración de millones de provincianos pobres.
    Ciudad Nezahualcóyotl nació en los años 60´s, luego de que se secara una laguna que inundaba contínuamente la ciudad. En esas tierras secas y salitrosas se establecieron millones de inmigrantes de los estado pobres de México, aunque también llegaron capitalinos empobrecidos, en busca de un lugar donde vivir.
    Los terrenos, unos terregales monumentales e insalubres, se fraccionaron en forma de damero y en ellos se construyeron miles de casitas muy pobres. Esa es la imagen que hasta hoy tienen muchos de Neza; una "ciudad perdida" o "villa miseria" como le llaman al sur del contiente.
    Este reportaje recoge diversos episodios de la historia de aquel municipio. De cómo pasó a ser de una de las zonas mas pobres de México, en la cual incluso muchos antropólogos sociales extranjeros vinieron a hacerr trabajos, a una historia de éxito en medio de adversidad. Neza es hoy una ciudad con todos los servicios, donde el promedio de las casas tiene tres habitaciones, un auto y las esperanzas de un futuro mejor.

    [​IMG]

    Aquí estaba un tiradero de basura y una de las zonas mas pobres de todo México. Hoy es esto y los pepenadores que vivían en aquella zona fueron reubicados a un nuevo proyecto inspirado en Curitiba, Brasíl, llamado "Universidad del Reciclaje".

    [​IMG]

    La avenida principal de Neza y el monumento obra de Sebastián, famoso esculltór originario de Guadalajara.

    [​IMG]

    Otra vista de la calle principal.

    [​IMG]

    El vecino municipio de Chimalhuacán es mas pobre pero está inciándose un proyecto para rescatar el Lago de Texcoco en zonas no habitadas, lo que subirá la calidad de vida de todo México DF y su zona metropolitana. Los mas beneficados serán los habitantes de la zona.

    [​IMG]

    Chimalhuacán tiene también un centro histórico que fué rescatado y contiene varios monumentos virreinales.

    [​IMG]

    Las zonas mas pobres lucen así pero los servicios se han añadido a una velocidad tal, que las calles cambian de aspecto de un mes a otro.

    [​IMG]
    Esta es actualmente una de esas calles.

    [​IMG]

    Universidad Tecnológica de Nezahualcóyotl

    [​IMG]

    Parque Bicentenario y centro comercial Plaza Jardín. Ya completados.

    ----- mensaje añadido, 22-mar-2011 a las 23:18 -----

    Si es actual. La zona está siendo objeto de estudio por parte de organismos internacionales pues buena parte de sus logros han sido conquistas sociales y servicios que la misma gente ha demandado. Es un ejemplo de organización ciudadana. No veo por qué no sea actual.

    Además no es una zona turística. En muchas partes sigue siendo pobre y peligroso.
     
    A GiulioRudolph y LuisCuahutemoc les gustó este mensaje.
  11. LuisCuahutemoc

    LuisCuahutemoc Suspendido

    Registro:
    9 Feb 2010
    Mensajes:
    1,020
    Likes:
    335
    aunque nezahualcoyotl sea una ciudad en progreso , aun no pinta para que este en los lugares para "atraer turismo "
    esta bien que este en esta seccion , y mas para los latinos y peruanos que creen que mexico es un pais violento , es tema les da un panorama diferente
     
    A MexiHumboldt le gustó este mensaje.
  12. rayo

    rayo Miembro de plata

    Registro:
    5 Abr 2009
    Mensajes:
    3,114
    Likes:
    745
    En esta zona como se maneja el control de la seguridad , hay delincuencia sus habitantes aparte de prosperos son gente con valores o el avance solo es economico ? ya que tengo entendido que en Mexico es muy dificil la situacion se vive mucha tension ya que los habitantes sufren de constantes robos y secuestros.
     
  13. MexiHumboldt

    MexiHumboldt Miembro de oro

    Registro:
    4 Feb 2011
    Mensajes:
    6,151
    Likes:
    4,369
    Les pongo este tema para que vean las ENORMES posibilidades comerciales que hay entre nuestros países. Por ahora Grupo Carso le está apostando todo a México....pero en un futuro no sería raro verlos remodelando extensas zonas de Lima con la experiencia que han tenido aquí.

    Muchas experiencias sociales y comunitarias son igualmente aplicables en Perú, pues las realidades son parecidas.

    Observen cómo es una ciudad que alcanzó grandes cosas sin pleitos ideológicos, populacherismos bananeros ni crispaciones políticas.

    Lo repito, NO ES JAUJA, aún tiene zonas pobres y peligrosas, pero por mucho está lejos de ser una favela o "población" caraqueña.

    Este sector poblacional es el que está cambiando México, lo está blindando contra populacherismos, lo está haciendo mas ciudadano y mas poderoso económicamente.

    Los intercambios que podemos tener son INCREIBLES. Piensen que México es un mercado donde:

    -El 96 de las casas tiene todos los servicios.

    -Las ventas de electrodomésticos han aumentado un 400% desde 1992.

    -Hay en promedio un auto por cada hogar mexicano.

    -Cada año, con crisis y todo, salen a las calles mas de 900,000 autos nuevos.

    -El mexicano promedio compra hoy sus víveres en supermercados.

    -Walmart abrirá una tienda por dia en el 2011.

    -Además de la mexico-estadounidense CIFRA-Walmart, son también fuertes las locales Soriana y Chedraui.

    -El mexicano promedio es asiduo asistente a conciertos y museos. La Ciudad de México tiene una de las mayores ofertas culturales y es la ciudad con mas museos en el mundo.

    -En el hogar mexicano promedio hay mas de tres habitaciones y viven cuatro personas.

    ESTO SALIO EN EL UNIVERSAL del DF, es del 2010

    La clase media en México

    [​IMG]







    Sin embargo hay estudios que ya consideran que la clase media rebasa el 70% de la población. Mas adelante un estudio al respecto.


    Cuelgo esto no para presumir, si no para señalar que PERU VA EN EL MISMO CAMINO!!!!

    El Perú se encuentra en la misma situación que México estaba al iniciar sus TLC con EEUU y Canadá.

    ----- mensaje añadido, 23-mar-2011 a las 19:05 -----


    La gente que vive ahí son empleados del sector transporte, servicios, obreros fabriles, comerciantes y microempresarios. Estos últimos tienen mucha presencia pública. Hay colonias de españoles y otras nacionalidades que tienen comercios en la zona.

    La inseguridad que ven en los medios se concentra en zonas específicas; Ciudad Juarez, Reynosa y en menor medida Tijuana. Todas ellas ciudades fronterizas donde, salvo Juarez, la vida normal no ha sido demasiado alterada.

    Tiene mas bien problemas específicos por zonas; robo a comercios, a peatones, de autos, pandillas (que han sido desarticuladas con éxito) y narcomenudeo (también por zonas, pues esto es muy vigilado). Creo que el mayor peligro para sus habitantes son los secuestros "express" y las extorsiones.

    Ciudad Neza es mas segura que Sao Paulo o Rio, por ejemplo.


    Este es un video del Gobierno Municipal. Sé que es propaganda pero lo encuentro ilustrativo y no tan irreal.

     
  14. g_d

    g_d Suspendido

    Registro:
    4 Mar 2010
    Mensajes:
    28,575
    Likes:
    25,459
    bueno,igual no veo la noticia acá, ojo no digo que sea el tema irrelevante sólo que no es la sección y claro que veo a México de manera macro no por los problemas en el norte y claro que tiene ciudades bonitas y que están progresando.

    PD: tengo curiosidad de cómo se pronuncia el nombre de la ciudad, se me hace dificultoso leerla XD qué significado tiene?
     
    Última edición: 23 Mar 2011
  15. MexiHumboldt

    MexiHumboldt Miembro de oro

    Registro:
    4 Feb 2011
    Mensajes:
    6,151
    Likes:
    4,369

    Hay dos notas periodísticas que te invito a leer. Son muy interesantes, sobre todo porque tienen un gobierno de izquierda que ha hecho mucho por la economía, los negocios y la cultura del lugar.

    Se pronuncia "Netsaualcóyotl" y significa coyote hambriento en náhuatl.
     
    A LuisCuahutemoc le gustó este mensaje.
  16. LuisCuahutemoc

    LuisCuahutemoc Suspendido

    Registro:
    9 Feb 2010
    Mensajes:
    1,020
    Likes:
    335
    te equivocaste bro
    es :

    ne-za-hual-co-yotl
    y si , significa coyote hambriento en honor al rey de texoco-mexica del mismo nombre
     
  17. MexiHumboldt

    MexiHumboldt Miembro de oro

    Registro:
    4 Feb 2011
    Mensajes:
    6,151
    Likes:
    4,369
    Endschuldigen Sie..... me traaaicionooó mi subconsciente...mexiHumboldtiano...

    Pero gracias bro...DANKE SCHÖN
     
  18. ClassM

    ClassM Miembro de bronce

    Registro:
    23 Dic 2011
    Mensajes:
    1,209
    Likes:
    675
    La verdad no me gusta Nada Ciudad Neza, los siento....
     
  19. MexiHumboldt

    MexiHumboldt Miembro de oro

    Registro:
    4 Feb 2011
    Mensajes:
    6,151
    Likes:
    4,369
    A mi tampoco, pero es una historia de superación. En su momento se le llegó a llamar la "Calcuta" mexicana...... Nunca estuvo tan j@dida pero ya sabes como somos para inventarle versiones nacionales a todas las cosas....

    Cd. Neza representa un portazo en las narices a todos aquellos que andan lloriqueando por nuestros "50 millones" de pobres. Digo, pobres hay y no los niego pero la clásica familia de Neza con dos coches y casa propia de autoconstrucción, ya no lo son.
     
  20. roberto daniken

    roberto daniken Miembro de plata

    Registro:
    16 May 2012
    Mensajes:
    3,473
    Likes:
    1,832
    lo que me gusta de neza es que está llena d gente amable, toda esa zona, Neza, Chimalhuacan, Los Reyes, la mayoría es gente que viene de provincia, tenía una novia que vivía en neza recuerdo k íbamos a los multicinemas que están en los Reyes, al mercado, a la comercial mexicana que esta por ahí, también fuimos a la feria de las nieves y a la del Amaranto en Tlahuac... por unos años visite mucho esa zona incluso de noche
     
    Última edición: 15 Feb 2014